February 2021

ASSESSING THE EFFECTS OF COVID-19 ON ACCESS TO WATER, SANITATION, AND HYGIENE – Country Deep Dive Report – Senegal

In May 2020, the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) tasked the Water, Sanitation, and Hygiene Partnerships and Learning for Sustainability (WASHPaLS) project with assessing the effects of the novel Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) on access to water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) services and products in USAID high priority and strategy-aligned countries. The assignment sought to characterize the current state of affairs and to forecast near-term trends (6–18 months) that could assist governments, donors and implementers prepare an informed response to the WASH-related impacts of the pandemic.

This report presents the detailed findings of the deep dive for Senegal.

The Senegalese government implemented a number of pandemic response measures at the end of March, including border closings, a nationwide closure of businesses, schools, places of worship, and suspensions of air travel. Nonetheless, relative to other countries we examined, Senegal’s movement declines during March, April, and early May were modest. Relaxation of the pandemic response measures resulted in steady return toward baseline levels of mobility through July.

Respondents to our SMS surveys reported that COVID-19 had a major impact on their incomes, with about 21 percent reporting losing their job and another 38 percent reporting earning less money. Among the 15 percent that ran a non-farm business, 19 percent closed their business. The government’s COVID-19 “solidarity fund” committed US$5.9 million to the urban water sector, and the government also declared two months of tariff-free water for consumers with water consumption levels under 20m3/month.

Our topline findings, by subsector, are as follows:

WATER SUPPLY – CURRENT STATUS

  1. Senegalese consumers report pandemic-related water access challenges comparable to other USAID high priority and strategy-aligned countries we studied.
  2. Large water suppliers reported financial distress from a two-month government-mandated tariff suspension and slow government reimbursement.
  3. Disruptions in supply chains have not had major impact on water supply provision.

Read More

In collaboration with USAID, Tetra Tech, FSG and Iris Group.

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